(Source: rawanaviv, via logicalharleyquinn)

(Source: josephwebb, via wikatiepedia)

anangelwholosthergrace:

Band people on a windy day be like

(via itsa-me-luig-i)

(Source: baruchobramowitz, via deadlynedly)

mellowmodesty:

thecakebar:

Apple Pie Fries Tutorial {click link for FULL recipe & tutorial}

oh my fuck

(via disco-overlords)

imldris:

Historical valentines ?

(Source: alisonendrix, via robertpicardos)

floozys:

this is so specific i love it 

floozys:

this is so specific i love it 

(via spirkcantwerk)

sub-lili:

wifes-sir

sub-lili:

wifes-sir

(Source: angellacervantes, via deadlynedly)

cliterallysame:

this is honestly my favorite post

(Source: seththewolf, via disco-overlords)

zohbugg:

Star Wars AU: Everything is the same, except R2-D2 doesn’t make beeps and whistles, and is instead voiced by Kayne West, who is given no script but is just reacting to all the crazy space shit going on around his little robot homie.

(via deadlynedly)

badsexisrape:

Erryday

(Source: sundaydecember, via mykillingjoke)

(Source: beautyisinallthingss, via mykillingjoke)

occupt:

emoji-nation. part 2.

(via gabsylocks)

medicalschool:

The Morphology of Human Blood Cells (1956)

Dorothy Sturm’s beautiful watercolors are difficult to distinguish from an actual microphotograph (except perhapsthey are clearer and more detailed than a micrograph, and certainly superior to images from the 1950’s). Sturm’s watercolor on paper illustrations, drawn directly from Wright-stained smears prepared by [microbiologists], depicted normal, pathological and infectious hematology with a clarity, detail and beauty that photomicrography of the 1950’s simply couldn’t approach. JAMA, in a review of the first edition, even called her work “of exceptional quality.”

[1] This table showing hematopoiesis (as it was understood in 1956) was the frontispiece of the first edition of Diggs’ The Morphology of Human Blood Cells. Here’s the key to this illustration.

[2] Cell types found in smears of peripheral blood from normal individuals

[3] Blood parasites

[4] Fat cells

[5] Megakarocytes and thrombocytes

(via queriousity)

jtotheizzoe:

Aatish Bhatia on the math trick behind MP3s, JPEGs, and Homer Simpson’s face … AKA Fourier Transforms.
You’re probably thinking “there’s no way that could be interesting”, but you’re wrong.
Previously we saw this trick (is it a trick?) in action to draw famous faces using only mathematical functions. 
(via Nautilus)

jtotheizzoe:

Aatish Bhatia on the math trick behind MP3s, JPEGs, and Homer Simpson’s face … AKA Fourier Transforms.

You’re probably thinking “there’s no way that could be interesting”, but you’re wrong.

Previously we saw this trick (is it a trick?) in action to draw famous faces using only mathematical functions

(via Nautilus)

(via queriousity)